Posts Tagged ‘ social ’

I feel like a nag…

images: top left, top right, bottom left, bottom right

Social networks are great for raising awareness about social and political causes. Since joining Fbook almost 4 months ago, I feel more knowledgeable about global and environmental concerns that may not have caught my attention (or, at least, as much of my attention) as before. This is due to certain Friends involvement with these particular causes…Friends who might be interested in the same issues as myself and/or Friends who have very different interests from my own. Some critics argue that this kind of online dialogue does nothing to actually help solve problems, yet others argue that it can lead to change…especially when directed towards organizations that are responsible for making important decisions.

Perhaps my teacher and researcher selves take over in these moments of open dialogue…sharing resources, providing links for further information, communicating the importance of attending to these issues, instigating debate to probe the ideas raised…not looking for agreement at all, just looking for some insightful chit chat. But I’m afraid that external selves who might not perceive this window of opportunity on Facebook will instead perceive me as a NAG. I don’t mean to disrupt the escapist FB posting flow – mindless sharing of retro music videos, funny pictures of cats, cute close-ups of babies, unbelievable moments of self-exposure on youtube – no, don’t get me wrong….I succumb to these pastimes just as much as everyone else. I guess that’s why I try to downplay my posts that relate to social and political issues, so it doesn’t sound like I’m lecturing….”I’m not a political activist but…” (aka – it’s ultimately up to you whether you read this or not but it is something you should know about….).

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Dear Facebook, how are you feeling?

OK…so the title of this entry could imply that I am continuing on my quest to understand the identity of FB, to understand the individuals behind the collective facade. You might also interpret this question from another perspective though…

How does Facebook (aka “community” network) feel as an emotional experience? How do YOU feel when you relate to Facebook? How much of how you feel depends on what’s going on in your own life vs. the life of Fbook?

I’m interested in the identity of FB but also in the experience of FB….which is why I enlisted. If FB is something we experience than maybe we should think about how it not only affects our minds, but also our bodies.

How do we embody Facebook? How does Facebook embody us?

Postself is a project that invites and welcomes collaboration. The following is a guest contribution from Valerie Lyman – her words have inspired me. I have yet to get to know Valerie in “real” life, however, experienced a visceral connection with her on another blog in which we dialogued about social media. I don’t know anything about Valerie except that she is another node in this networked pursuit of the philosophy of the networked self. Valerie, if you’re out there, feel free to expand on your insightful words below….and thanks for contributing to Postself.

…..

May 12, 2010
from: http://www.ecuad.ca/~rburnett/Weblog/archives/2010/05/are_social_media_social.html#comments
Valerie Lyman

Another approach to the question of ‘are social media, social?’ could be, after using social media, do you feel like you’ve had a social experience? This leaves out the social value part of the question and focuses more on the feeling of the experience and what it does to the emotional body. The answer for me, surprisingly, is Yes. Even though I am not a fan (another word) of the quality of discourse on say, Facebook, I can and do leave an extended Facebook browsing session feeling much the way I do after leaving an actual visit with my friends – my emotional body is somewhat exercised and I am ready for work. This is not to say they are the same thing, but to find that there is any overlap in sensation at all surprised me. Why should it? The telephone accomplishes the same thing and I never wondered at that. What’s different though is that the telephone is a highly personal, intimate, generally one on one mode of communication. Facebook is personal in as much as identity creation is concerned – the way people mark up their facebook or myspace pages reminds me of an expanded version of the way students once marked up their notebooks or young adults invariably recorded a highly personal outgoing message (usually with music) on their first answering machine – their gateway to the world and small space in which to declare ‘this is me.’

So although social networking sites have expanded this space, the interactions that occur within it are more communal and less personal. We might ask what is the cumulative effect and value for us of such increased impersonal or group communications. The obvious upside is that as Ron pointed out we connect and cross paths with people (and interests) that we otherwise might not have, and can perhaps articulate ourselves into the whole of society with more accuracy than we could before. What is the downside to a de-personalized communication forum as the personal norm?

…..

Friend Stats, May 23, 2010

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Useful information to archive for future analysis….
These are thumbnail images that were created by using 1) Friend Wheel, and 2) Friend Sets, both are Facebook Games that you can add to your profile. The applications arrange all of your FB connections into visualizations. I think they should be categorized under Applications instead of Games, but then again, maybe that’s because I haven’t found a use for any of the other FB games.

I am actually glad that I am not a game person today because it seems I will do anything on Fbook in order to avoid writing my paper. Remember how I told you that I had severe procrastination problems? Well, sometimes I will unconsciously/consciously structure my procrastination so that I am still productive, just not on the task that I am supposed to be doing. This explains why my posts to Postself have been more frequent this past week….and (fingers crossed) why I will be making fewer posts over this next week (please hold me to it!!!)

“You have to be somebody before you can share yourself”

:: Inspired by Calvin’s Schrag’s book The Self After Postmodernity, I am in pursuit of a philosophy of The Self After Facebook. For the autobiographical tone of this pursuit, I am indebted to Tom Sherman‘s Before and After the I-Bomb: An Artist in the Information Environment. I recently found out about another book that might be to my liking called, You Are Not a Gadget, by Jaron Lanier. I LOVE the UK edition front cover (see above). I’d like a poster of it for my office wall.

:: I’ve been thinking more about the social and interactive aspect of networks the past couple of days. Hannah Arendt (1958) wrote that “the subject appears and exists only in relation to others,” specifically through our actions and words – who you are is disclosed through your words and deeds. To examine the networked self, we need to not forget about the social behaviors of others, and of the network at large. To understand the post-Facebook “self” we need to understand the “social” in social media. The postself exists not merely through self-interpretation but through relations with others on/with/in the web. The internet has been described as a place where people engage in identity work, and an important arena for inquiry into the production of postmodern selves (Broad & Joos, 2004). The internet has evolved into a place/space for human interaction with social media. What is “social” about social media? (see Ron Burnett’s blog in the previous link for a good overview) What makes it more than a collection of individual actions?


%d bloggers like this: