Dymaxion Self

November was busy. Needless to say, I am yet another apologetic blogger to use the good ol’ “sorry I haven’t posted” line… However, Postself headquarters is busting with lots of self-reflexive activity as the Fbook interface continues to provide many opportunities for dialogue and critique. For those of you who have digital profiles meshed within FB, you may want to catch up on the insightful interaction that occurs in our satellite location > http://www.facebook.com/postself < where relevant links and videos are being shared by fellow Postselfers.

Although I’ve been consumed with many tasks, I continue to live up to my manifesto on a daily basis. In fact, I am now finding that I tend to use Fbook as a strange kind of coping mechanism that contrasts what I am faced with on my other screen. At home, I work with a double screen set-up and I often go back and forth to Fbook when confronted with difficult work, the same way I venture to the kitchen for snacks. I also continue to maintain and archive my Postself “list” of anything and everything to revisit and expand upon later. Just this past week, several topics have made the blogosphere and entered into our FB portal discussions — namely, the cartoon profile campaigns that have popped up and emotional reactions to the new FB layout changes — plenty food for thought.

Speaking of archived lists….for some time now, I’ve been wanting to post about our relationship to Facebook as a digital archive — an archived database that is connected to and integrated within all of the other networked social media applications we use, such as Flickr, Twitter, Vimeo, Youtube, Tumblr, etc. For instance, I will often find myself ‘sharing’ something just to have the link made readily available in my profile and just in case one of my friends posts something in response that triggers an idea or another resource to follow up on. Because it seems I’m on Fbook so much, I tend to search through my archived links rather than venturing over to my delicious account.

This networked language we use today may be new, but the act of archiving one’s personal life is not. The internet, however, provides a multilinear process for us to use, consisting of interconnections to different locations for self-storage. A couple of years ago there was an art exhibit developed in San Francisco called “Self Storage,” which was inspired by the historical precedent of the Dymaxion Chronofile, a system that Buckminster Fuller devised to chronicle his life. I began thinking more about Fuller a month ago while preparing a paper for a conference. Then, just like anything significant and meant to be contemplated, his name kept popping up all over the place. I think Bucky Fuller was extremely far ahead of his time, with interests and behaviours quite relevant for our current cultural moment. It has been said that his life is the most documented human life in history…

From Stanford’s R. Buckminster Fuller Archive:

The centerpiece of the collection, in many ways, is the Dymaxion Chronofile, an exhaustive journal of Fuller’s trajectory from 1920 until his death in 1983. Fuller had been collecting clippings and artifacts since he was a child. But in 1917, he began a formal chronological file which he would later call the Dymaxion Chronofile. The Chronofile was a vast scrapbook that included copies of all his incoming and outgoing correspondence, newspaper clippings, notes and sketches, and even dry cleaning bills. Initially, the Chronofile was bound into handsome leather-backed volumes. In later years, to save space and expenses, the Chronofile was simply stored in boxes. By the end of his life, this exhaustive “lab notebook” of his life’s experiment amounted to 270 linear feet.

Fuller intended for the Chronofile to be a case study of his life in context, in which his daily activities were presented in parallel with developments in technology and society. In it, he at once traced the evolution of his own thoughts, relationships, and business ventures; and documented new inventions, trends, and technologies that were emerging on the broader level.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

There’s already applications being produced that allow for FB interactions to be archived in books. Which makes me wonder how we might “selfpost” differently if we knew there was the potential of our digital identities to be preserved not only on paper but bound within a book.

* thanks to Postselfer Marianela for this Youtube clip

/screening/

tag…you’re it.

PostPostself…

I’ve been considering the development of a PostPostself portal, a spinoff of sorts — a reflection of the making process of Postself. It would consist of documentation and reflection on the process of becoming a reflective networked self (as opposed to being a non-reflective networked self). I would explore the challenges, struggles, and rewards of contemplating one’s actions and thoughts while making a project that engages with Facebook. This is very meta….yet perhaps fitting for our complex times.

[*Note: I tend to lean towards other writers who think the “post” is over with….we are posted out. So perhaps I would go with the title of Superself or Alterself, in reference to the other prefixes put forth. For now, because of the double-meaning implied with my use of “post” I will stick with it.]

For my posts on Postself, I keep a text file on my desktop where I “scribble” ideas down as they come to me – how I feel about my relationship with Fbook, what it makes me think about, etc. I date these ideas so that I can refer to them in a chronological manner when looking back on my journey. I then revisit them when I find the time to publish posts to the blog. Some of these comments extend beyond how my relation to Selfpost, and move toward an “unfolding of insights” (Irwin, 2003) about the larger network culture we exist with/in.

Self-reflexivity can be a challenge. Of course Postself is fun and rewarding, but it is quite isolating as well. You know when you have just finished reading a really great book or watching a really great film, and nobody you talk with seems to share the same enthusiasm? Immersing in Continue reading

Who pokes and why?

I don’t get it. I had my first poke experience yesterday and am left baffled...

It was from a “non-friend” but someone whom I wouldn’t mind being a Friend. I didn’t know what else to do so I poked back. If it had been someone whom I did not want to be my Friend, I simply would have avoided it. The “poker” and myself did end up confirming our FB Friendship but I’m not so sure I like how the whole transaction was initiated…

What is the deal with virtual “poking”? What is Fbook etiquette with poking and other virtual acts of giving and receiving?

In real life, you wouldn’t go up and poke someone that you haven’t been in touch with for years, would you? I guess it might depend on the kind of relationship you once had. Now that I think about it, the above said “poker” was actually the type to “poke” in real life so I guess it wasn’t all that out of character. But, then again, that was high school. On the other hand, Facebook is a lot like high school….which was one of the reasons I avoided it for four years until I forced myself to embrace it as a space for learning and expanding my networked self. Until I am confronted with the decision of whether to attend a “real-life” high school reunion, I will allow myself to be “poked”…for the sake of an authentic Postself.

What’s on your mind?

+

“Part of the disclosive dynamic of aesthetic experience is that in revealing the fore-understandings that have shaped one’s way of seeing and being, it also shows that we are the living embodiments of those structures and that what we explicitly are and might yet be as is inseparably bound up with what they might implicitly entail.”

~ Nicholas Davey, (1994). “Aesthetics as the Foundations of Human Experience”, from the Journal of Art and Design Education, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp. 73-81.

Join the Facebook page – the POSTSELF PORTAL – to stay updated on the conversation >

I go there to take a break

I GO THERE TO TAKE A BREAK
I GO THERE TO AVOID DOING THINGS
I GO THERE TO FORGET, BUT END UP REMEMBERING
I GO THERE TO REMEMBER, BUT END UP FORGETTING
I GO THERE TO GET A LAUGH, BUT SOMETIMES I AM DISGUSTED
I GO THERE TO WATCH OTHER PEOPLE
I GO THERE TO BE WATCHED
I GO THERE TO BROWSE, BUT END UP BEING TOLD WHAT I “LIKE”
I GO THERE TO CONNECT
I GO THERE TO DISCONNECT
I GO THERE FOR DIALOGUE, BUT END UP TALKING TO MY SELF
I GO THERE TO ESCAPE, BUT END UP MAKING NEW FRIENDS
I GO THERE TO PROCRASTINATE
I GO THERE TO LEARN
I GO THERE TO LOSE MY SELF, BUT OFTEN FIND MY SELF
I GO THERE TO FIND MY SELF, BUT OFTEN LOSE MY SELF

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

%d bloggers like this: